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Damascus Gate (Bab al-Amud)
Damascus Gate (Bab al-Amud)

Damascus Gate (Bab al-Amud)

17 Sultan Suleiman, Jerusalem, Israel

The basics

Built in the 16th century, under Suleiman the Magnificent, but dating back to the Roman emperor Hadrian, the Damascus Gate faces north towards the West Bank city of Nablus and the 200-mile (320-kilometer) road to Damascus. At times of strain between the Palestinian authorities and the Israeli government, the checkpoint can feel tense, with long lines, meaning few Jerusalem tours pass by here. The Damascus Gate area is a transit hub for West Bank destinations such as Bethlehem and Jericho, as well as Jordan.

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Things to know before you go

  • The US Department of State recommends travelers exercise caution around Jerusalem Old City, particularly the Damascus Gate and Herod’s Gate, because of the risk of political violence.
  • Sha’ar Shechem Square is perfectly positioned for photos of the gate.
  • Ramps and smooth paving stones make the Damascus Gate suitable for strollers and wheelchairs, although parents will find back carriers easier around the Old City, which has many steep and cobbled streets.
  • The Damascus Gate connects to wheelchair-friendly routes around the Old City. Download the Accessible JLM app to plan travel.
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How to get there

The Damascus Gate sits in between Herod’s Gate and New Gate on the northern section of Jerusalem’s city wall. Shared sherut taxis connect to Jordan and Ben Gurion Airport, Israel’s main airport; from Jerusalem Yitzhak Navon train station, catch the light rail to Shechem Gate (Line 1).

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When to get there

When the political situation permits, the Damascus Gate is open day and night. It looks spectacular at twilight, illuminated against the night sky.

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Jerusalem’s Gates

Jerusalem’s old city walls, built during the 16th century (but dating back around 3,000 years), contain eight different gates. Running clockwise from west to south, they are: Jaffa Gate, New Gate, Damascus Gate, Herod’s Gate, Lion’s Gate, Gate of Mercy (Golden Gate), Dung Gate, and Zion Gate. The Gate of Mercy is sealed and many members of the Jewish faith believe it will not open until the Messiah comes.

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Frequently Asked Questions
The answers provided below are based on answers previously given by the tour provider to customers’ questions.
Q:
What are the nearest attractions to Damascus Gate (Bab al-Amud)?
A:
Q:
What else should I know about attractions in Jerusalem?
A:
As well as visiting the Damascus Gate (Bab al-Amud), check out these trip ideas to make the most of your visit: