Recent Searches
Clear

Things to Do in Turkish Riviera - page 3

Category

Kayakoy
star-4
10
8 Tours and Activities

The ghost town of Kayaköy – a cluster of about a thousand centuries-old stone houses scattered across a hillside – has a poignant history. Formerly inhabited by Greek citizens of the Ottoman Empire and known by the Greek name of Levissi or Livissi, it was abandoned in 1923 after the Greek-Turkish population exchange that took place after the founding of the Turkish Republic.

The story of the village (renamed “Eskibahçe”) and its inhabitants has been fictionalized by Louis de Bernières in Birds Without Wings, a sweeping novel that takes place during the late Ottoman Empire and WWI.

Walking among Kayaköy's crumbling, empty houses and through the narrow lanes can be rather eerie, but the deserted village has a surreal beauty to it. There are a couple of churches and chapels, of which the most significant is the Panayia Pyrgiotissa (built in 1888), where a few fragments of frescoes and mosaics can still be seen.

Several cafes and restaurants are housed in atmospheric old buildings on the edges of the village.

Read More
Olympos Beydaglari National Park
star-4.5
22
3 Tours and Activities

South of Antalya, Beydaglari Coastal National Park has over 74,000 acres (30,000 hectares) of coastal cliffs, beaches, and mountains. Spectacular hiking trails, fascinating archaeological sites, and dramatic views over the Mediterranean make it a popular day trip from Antalya and Kemer.

Read More
Taurus Mountains (Toros Daglari)
star-4
39
24 Tours and Activities

A massive 350-mile mountain range standing tall over the plains of southeastern Turkey, the Taurus Mountains (Toros Daglari) are full of craggy peaks and clear lakes worthy of exploration. The range once separated two major cultures of the ancient world: Anatolia and Syria.

Aladaglar National Park is home to Demirkazik, the range's tallest peak at 12,323 feet (3,756 meters). With Antalya as a base, visitors come to the Taurus Mountains for hiking, mountain climbing, and in the winter, skiing at two different resorts in the range. Old caravan routes run through the seemingly impenetrable mountains, leading to dramatic canyons, hidden pastures, isolated valleys and pristine mountain lakes.

Many of the peaks are formed of white limestone, though often heavily covered in pine and cedar forests. The mountains are named after the bull (Taurus) that once represented many of the ancient gods here. It is possible to come across one of the many small villages that have existed here for centuries.

Read More
Fethiye Lycian Rock Tombs (Tomb of Amyntas)
star-4.5
80
6 Tours and Activities

Carved into the cliffside above town is a group of ancient Lycian tombs that have become some of Fethiye’s most famous landmarks: the Fethiye Lycian Rock Tombs (Tomb of Amyntas). Set higher than the rest, the most important of the tombs was built in 350 B.C. for “Amyntas, son of Hermagios” (according to a Greek inscription on the wall of the tomb). He is thought to have been a local Lycian ruler or nobleman.

The entrance to the Amyntas Tomb was carved out of the rock so as to look like a temple portico, with two Ionic-style columns topped by a triangular pediment. Grave robbers appear to have broken into the tomb a long time ago, as is clear from the missing panel in the bottom-right-hand side of the doorway.

About 500 meters down and to the right (east) is a cluster of several smaller Lycian rock tombs carved into the cliff face; very little is known about the identities of those buried here.

In addition to seeing the Fethiye rock tombs themselves, visitors who make the hike up will be rewarded with fabulous views of the town and the surrounding coastline. The best time to visit (and consequently the busiest) is at sunset.

Read More
Ephesus Terrace Houses
star-5
930
83 Tours and Activities

The ruins of the ancient city of Ephasus are located in Selcuk, Turkey. The city was a major port city in its time, but the port has since silted over and the shoreline is quite a distance away. One of the important sections of the ruins are the Ephesus Terrace Houses, which are on a hill across from the Hadrian Temple. There are six units on three terraces, the oldest dating back to the 1st century BC. It was used as a residence until the 7th century AD.

Two of the houses are now open as a museum, and they give visitors a glimpse at what family life might have been like during the Roman Period. The houses contained mosaics on the floors and frescoes on the walls, which are now protected. They had central interior courtyards, and although most of the houses were two stories tall, the second levels have collapsed over time.

Read More
Marmaris Marina
star-4.5
38
9 Tours and Activities

With its colorful fishing boats and dazzling fleet of luxury yachts, Marmaris Marina is the lively focal point of the city’s waterfront, set against a dramatic backdrop of Marmaris Castle. Known as one of the most important ports along the Eastern Mediterranean coast, Marmaris makes a popular stop for sunseekers cruising the Turkish Riviera. Despite boasting space for up to 830 yachts, the marina can fill quickly during the summer months.

Even if you’re not arriving by sea, the picturesque marina makes a pleasant addition to a walking tour. The waterfront promenade is lined with restaurants, bars and cafes, as well as an enormous shopping center and an open-air swimming pool.

Read More
Olympos
star-5
10
6 Tours and Activities

The ancient city of Olympos lies in ruins in a deep valley southwest of Antalya. Founded in the Hellenistic era and assimilating into the Roman empire in 78 BC, the town is famous for its cute treehouse accommodations that line the valley before ending at the Mediterranean Sea and the eternal flames of the nearby Mount Chimaera.

Read More
St Nicholas Church
star-3.5
38
19 Tours and Activities

Originally built in AD 343, St. Nicholas Church in Demre is one of Turkey’s most important Christian pilgrimage sites. Rebuilt by Constantine IX, the church is known for its stunning Byzantine frescoes and mosaics and houses the sarcophagus of St. Nicholas, the original Santa Claus.

Read More
Clock Tower
star-4.5
202
8 Tours and Activities

The Clock Tower is a classic landmark in Antalya and is one of the few remaining Roman towers dating back to the second century. While the tower was once part of the city's fortifications, the clock was added later and today stands as a commandeering structure in the neighborhood area known as Kaldekapisi (Castle Gate).

Kaldekapisi marks the border between the old city and the new and hosts many stalls set up in front of the Clock Tower selling handicrafts and fresh pomegranate juice. The tower is typically seen on walking tours in Antalya.

Read More
Dilek National Park (Dilek Milli Parki)
star-3.5
52
11 Tours and Activities

Covering 87 square miles (227 square kilometers), the Dilek Peninsula-Buyuk Menderes Delta National Park occupies a peninsula south of Kusadasi on Turkey’s Aegean coast. Natural wonders abound here, from pebble beaches and wildlife to footpaths, ancient ruins, and a canyon hiking trail.

Read More

More Things to Do in Turkish Riviera

Ancient City of Kaunos

Ancient City of Kaunos

star-5
69
4 Tours and Activities

Ancient City of Kaunos near Dalyan, Turkey is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the area. Kaunos was an ancient city founded in the 9th century BC, and it was quite important by 400 BC. It was located on the border between Lycia and Caria, and the city's culture had characteristics of both empires. The city was once an important trading post on the sea, though today it is set back a few miles from the sea since the coastline has moved over the centuries. The receding coastline, attacks from various tribes, and a malaria epidemic led to the decline of Kaunos, and the city was abandoned by the 15th century.

The ruins include a well preserved theater, parts of the old city walls, and an acropolis. There's also a basilica, Roman baths, two Hellenistic temples and four Roman temples. From the acropolis, you can enjoy a gorgeous view of the ancient city. The theater could hold 5,000 people and is still occasionally used for events. Nearby you can also see Lycian tombs in the rocks above the Dalyan River.

Learn More
Demre (Myra)

Demre (Myra)

star-2.5
20
9 Tours and Activities

Demre, formerly known as Kale, is a small agricultural town on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. It was also the ancient Lycian town of Myra. A community of Christian Greeks lived here until the 1920s when they were forced to relocate to Greece during the population exchange between Turkey and Greece. Abandoned Greek houses serve as a reminder of this time.

Though not as big as the areas closer to the Antalya airport, Demre's history, warm weather, and proximity to the sea make this town a pleasant and popular vacation spot. Many tourists, especially Christians, come here on a pilgrimage to visit the tomb of Saint Nicholas and his church. Saint Nicholas was the historical figure who eventually became Santa Claus. He lived in and was the bishop of Myra during the 4th century.

Other attractions in Demre include the ruins of Myra, such as a Roman theater and tombs cut into the rock walls. There are also boat trips to see the sunken ruins of the nearby island of Kekova. The well-known long distance hiking trail, the Lycian Way, also passes through Demre and the ancient town of Myra.

Learn More
Patara Beach (Patara Plaji)

Patara Beach (Patara Plaji)

star-5
65
4 Tours and Activities

Just outside the ancient Lycian city of Patara, Patara Beach (Patara Plajı) is known as one of the most beautiful on the coast of the Turkish Riviera. At 11 miles long, it is one of the longest beaches in the area. Its soft, white sand and calm blue waters make it a particularly welcoming Mediterranean beach, in an area known for beaches of pebbles and stones.

As it is part of a national park, seasonal wildlife is protected by the Turkish government and can be spotted seasonally. There are many native birds and sea turtles, who come to nest in the sands. At Patara Beach’s easternmost point, there is a scenic rocky cove worth seeking out.

History exists here as the half-buried remains of an ancient Roman amphitheater partially covered by sand. Because of its nearby historic ruins and national park status, the beach area cannot be developed and sees very few tourists. Many archaeological sites can be viewed along the road to the beach.

Learn More
Antalya Museum (Antalya Muzesi)

Antalya Museum (Antalya Muzesi)

star-5
190
8 Tours and Activities

Born out of an attempt to prevent the country’s archaeological treasures from being plundered after World War I, the Antalya Museum (Antalya Müzesi) first opened in 1922. Exhibiting over 12,000 artifacts relating to the history of Anatolia’s Mediterranean and Pamphylia regions, it’s one of the largest and most important museums in Turkey, and is sometimes called the Antalya Archaeological Museum.

Learn More
Aqua Dream Waterpark

Aqua Dream Waterpark

star-4.5
3
4 Tours and Activities

Aqua Dream Waterpark is one of Turkey's largest water parks and the biggest water park in Marmaris. It is located on the top of a hill overlooking the city, which offers visitors a spectacular view of the city and surrounding landscape while enjoying the rides at the water park. The water park has a wide variety of water slides, each offering a different experience. Some are body slides while others involve sitting on a tube. There are also several pools, including a wave pool, a pool that doesn't allow children, and a normal swimming pool. The water park also has a children's area for smaller children who aren't old enough for the bigger slides. Along the perimeter of the pools, chairs and umbrellas are set up where you can lounge, relax, and sunbathe.

Aqua Dream Waterpark is fun for the whole family. It has a restaurant and bar with both indoor and outdoor seating, changing rooms, lockers, and hot and cold showers. There are lifeguards on duty at all times to ensure the safety of the visitors. Bring your bathing suit, towel and sunscreen.

Learn More
Datça Peninsula

Datça Peninsula

Datça Peninsula straddles two sunny seas, with its northern coast looking out towards the Aegean, and its southern coast out to the Mediterranean. The last stretch of Turkey’s Turquoise Coast is full of wildflower-covered hills, jagged coastal cliffs, and golden beaches. The peninsula is a popular stop when sailing from Bodrum or Marmaris.

Learn More
DoluSu Park

DoluSu Park

star-3
1
1 Tour and Activity

DoluSu Park is one of the largest and most varied water parks along Turkey’s Turquoise Coast—and it's located 30 miles (50 kilometers) south of Antalya. Whether you come for the private beach, aquarium, swimming pools, water slides, activities, or water sports, rest assured that the park has something to suit all ages and interests.

Learn More
Temple of Hadrian at Ephesus

Temple of Hadrian at Ephesus

star-5
228
18 Tours and Activities

The Temple of Hadrian at Ephesus is one of the highlights of the ruins of Ephesus in Turkey. It was built around 118 AD and is actually more of a monument to Hadrian, Artemis, and the people of Ephesus. Hadrian's temple is small, but there is a beautiful arch on the outside, a porch, and a small main hall. The porch is supported by pillars and Corinthian columns. A statue of Hadrian once stood on a podium in the temple, but it has been lost. On the front of the porch are bases with the names of Galerius, Maximianus, Diocletianus, and Constantius Chlorus inscribed on them, indicating that the bases might have once held statues of these emperors.

Panel reliefs on the inside depict Medusa warding off the bad spirits, the mythological foundation of Ephesus, and various religious scenes. The reliefs seen today are plaster replicas, while the originals are protected in the Ephesus Museum.

Learn More
Alanya Ataturk House Museum (Alanya Atatürk Evi Müzesi)

Alanya Ataturk House Museum (Alanya Atatürk Evi Müzesi)

star-5
180
2 Tours and Activities

The 2-story residence where Mustafa Kemal Atatürk—the first President of Turkey—stayed during official visits between 1930 and 1935 is now a museum dedicated to the legendary revolutionary. Filled with personal effects and historic items, the Alanya Ataturk House Museum (Alanya Atatürk Evi Müzesi) is a fascinating tribute to Atatürk’s visits to Antalya.

Learn More
Water Planet Aquapark

Water Planet Aquapark

star-2
2
2 Tours and Activities

The biggest water park on Turkey’s Mediterranean coast sits southeast of Antalya in between Manavgat and Alanya, overlooking the sparkling turquoise sea. With 24 rides from family slides to Kamikaze chutes, the Water Planet Aquapark is a fun-filled day out for the whole family. There’s a splash pool full of interactive animated toys for toddlers to enjoy while all kids love floating around the Lazy Rivers and splashing in the wave pools. Several adrenaline-pumping slides are perfect for thrill-seeking teens, including the spiraling Black Hole and the Four Twisters. If that’s not enough, try Water Planet Aqua Park's 70-meter (230-foot) bungee jump or rafting on the wave pool (both extra charge). Lifeguards are on duty at all the rides and facilities include sun loungers, showers, changing rooms and lockers, several restaurant and bar options – from fast food to à la carte – a henna tattoo parlor and a few souvenir stalls.

Learn More
Basilica of St. John

Basilica of St. John

star-5
864
70 Tours and Activities

A visit to St. John’s Basilica allows a glimpse into the history of this ancient site, built by Byzantine Emperor Justinian in the sixth century. It is believed that the church sits on the burial grounds of John the Apostle and was designed in the shape of a cross. At its completion, it was covered by six domes, with many of the walls presumably once covered in frescoes.

As nearby Ephesus began to lose significance, the Basilica of St. John was converted into a mosque, hit by an earthquake and completely destroyed by a Mongol army in 1402. All that remains today are various bricks and stones alongside the marble columns that once held up the structure, but recent restoration gives visitors the context to visualize and understand its former status and significance.

Many combine their visit with a walk to the nearby Ayasuluk Fortress atop Ayasuluk Hill, where St. John is said to have written his gospel. A climb up offers great views of the surrounding area.

Learn More
Myndos Gate (Myndos Kapisi)

Myndos Gate (Myndos Kapisi)

star-3
4
2 Tours and Activities

Once guarding the western entrance to the ancient city of Halicarnassus, the grand Myndos Gate (Myndos Kapısı) marked the route to nearby Myndos (now Gümüslük) and remains a prominent landmark of modern-day Bodrum. Today, the peripheral walls that once ran for seven kilometers around the city lie in ruin, but the striking remains of the Myndos Gate are a lasting reminder of its former glory.

Built in the fourth century B.C., the gate was one of only two entrances to the city, which was protected by a trio of watchtowers and fronted by a 15-meter-wide moat. Unfortunately, despite its strong fortifications, the gate was breached in 333 B.C. when Alexander the Great besieged the city, and the preserved remains are now all that is left of the famous battle site.

Learn More
Konyaalti Beach (Konyaalti Plaji)

Konyaalti Beach (Konyaalti Plaji)

star-5
180
2 Tours and Activities

One of Antalya’s two main city beaches, Konyaalti Beach (Konyaaltı Plajı) is a popular spot for both locals and travelers. Stretching for 4.3 miles (7 kilometers) west of the city, Konyaalti has a mix of pebble and sand beaches, where sun worshipers can swim and enjoy water sports against the dramatic backdrop of the Beydağlari Mountains.

Learn More
Selimiye

Selimiye

star-4
1
9 Tours and Activities

Selimiye is a small seaside fishing village about 25 miles from the city of Marmaris, Turkey. It is located on the Bozburun Peninsula along the Aegean Sea. Due to its unspoiled and laid back charm, Selimiye is often referred to as the real face of Turkey. While there are a few small hotels and guesthouses, you won't find big resorts here. There are restaurants and cafes serving traditional Turkish food, including plenty of fish caught fresh from the Aegean Sea and locally grown fruits and vegetables. Selimiye is well known for growing figs and almonds.

The town has a long tradition of wooden boat making, so visitors will see many boat yards in the area. These traditional boats are called gulets. Due to Selimiye's location and boat-making tradition, boat trips are popular activity for exploring the area. You can also visit the ruins of Hydas. The remains of three castles can be found in the hills of Selimiye. Near the shore is an old stone lighthouse, and southeast of the bay you'll find the remains of the city walls from the Hellenistic period. Visitors can also enjoy swimming in the sea from the small beach called Silimani.

Learn More